Topic 1- Digital Visitors and Residents

The web is a revolutionary tool that has a profound impact on everyone’s daily lives in the 21st Century. From working to socialising, everyone has different wants and requirements out of the web. As a result, there are different competency levels, skill-sets and levels of confidence associated with being present digitally. There really is a stigma of getting left behind if you’re not online in modern society.

Marc Prensky proposed an explanation for differing computing competencies based on the fundamental ideology that there is a strong correlation between age and competency with technology. He said that those who were younger are more comfortable with digital environments than those of the older generations. He expressed these ideas through the following terms:

‘Natives’ which represent the younger generation who are very competent digitally as this is the times they have grown up in with technology everywhere.

‘Immigrants’ are those ‘who were not born into the digital age’ (Prensky, 2001) and have to adapt in order to survive but will never be fully competent.

In the video below Sree Sreenivisan explains the idea of Natives and Immigrants as well as highlighting that immigrants can be fully competent breaking through the idea of immigrants just ‘keeping up’.

There is also an alternative typology which is the idea of ‘Digital Residents and Visitors’. This looks past the divides in age but rather how much technology is incorporated into one’s life.

Residents are individuals who spends a lot of their time online, they have a strong online identity and are very active through online mediums.

Visitors are individuals who uses web only when needed. There is a clear divide in their time which they set aside to going online, it isn’t an integrated part of their lives.

The following video also outlines the terms in more depth:

Here is my personal resident/ visitor map:

screen-shot-2017-02-11-at-18-47-07

From a personal perspective I would describe myself as a digital resident. This is as I am avid user of social media as well as a competent user of online tools such as online banking and educational/tutorial websites. However, I would put a caveat on this in that my use to digital tools is currently predominately from a personal perspective and my professional online identity is yet to be established. This can be seen in the map above. But, I do think this is quite normal for my age.

Do you agree? And how do you view your online presence?

References:

jiscnetskills (2014) Visitors and residents. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPOG3iThmRI (Accessed: 11 February 2017).

Prensky, M., (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants.

Prensky, M., (2009). From Digital Natives to Digital Wisdom

TEDx Talks and Sreenivasan, S. (2015) Digital natives vs. Digital immigrants | Sree Sreenivasan | TEDxNewYork. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n_9gI0B4nS4 (Accessed: 11 February 2017).

White, D., & Cornu, A. L. (2008). Tall blog.

White, D. S., & Cornu, A. L. (2011). Visitors and Residents: A new typology for online engagement. First Monday16(9).

White, D. S., & Cornu, A. L. (2011). Visitors and Residents: A new typology for online engagement.

White, ©d. (2014) Example visitor and resident maps. Available at: https://www.jisc.ac.uk/guides/evaluating-digital-services/example-visitor-and-resident-maps (Accessed: 11 February 2017).
Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Topic 1- Digital Visitors and Residents

  1. Hi Jordan,

    I thought this was an extremely interesting post. I particularly liked how you set out Prenskys initial ideologies of Natives and immigrants, suggesting age as the main factor in digital competence, before referencing Sree Sreenivisan TED Talk which highlighted that digital immigrants could still be fully competent online, something I definitely agree with. From my experiences I have found that a great number of older people are more proficient online users than myself.

    You mentioned the stigma attached to getting left behind if you do not currently access online content in a modern society. Do you believe that as online systems advance the stigma will continue to perpetuate forcing more people to move online, or do you think this stigma will decline in the future as individuals become more understanding of variations in digital proficiency? Would love to hear what you think.
    Thanks, David

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi David! Sorry for the late reply I had no idea you has commented, I just thought everyone didn’t see my blog haha! I’m glad you enjoyed my blog and with regards to your comment I would say most definitely. As technology and online systems continue to grow and move forward I believe everyone is always wanted to keep up and not be left behind. I believe this is much a part for technology as a whole which is closely linked to digital competence.

      Like

  2. Hi Jordan,

    I enjoyed reading your first post; your style of writing is clear which makes it easy to follow. The video explaining digital natives and immigrants was a good text breaker and made the blog stand out. However, I think you could include images on your digital resident/visitor graph.

    The fundamental point you mentioned is how Prensky’s analogy focuses primarily on the correlation between age and digital proficiency. I think the generational difference is not based on age, but rather levels of motivation (Beethman & Sharpe, 2010). Thus, I think further research should investigate other individual factors in order to understand differences within the digital world. Overall, it is important to take into account how the digital world is constantly growing, and therefore, can impact on how individuals engage with technology.

    Taking this into consideration, do you think the generational difference is actually due to one’s age?

    Thanks,
    Wei

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Wei! Sorry for the late reply I had no idea you has commented, I just thought everyone didn’t see my blog haha!
      I agree and I think my map would have looked more professional in my blog.
      In regards to your comment, I think the study is very intriguing linking motivation to generational differences. Whilst I would agree to some extent some segments of generations are not motivated to using online tools, as I said in my post I think there is a stigma attached with ‘getting left behind’ and thus I see this as a factor as to why everyone wishes to be online.
      However, I wouldn’t agree with Prensky’s idea that its solely due to age and therfore I think there are a vast number of factors including motivation as you said that affects individuals online use.
      Thank you for your comment and I look forward to keeping up with you blog!
      Jordan

      Like

  3. Hi Jordan,

    I like how you frame your discussion with an acknowledgment of differing levels of confidence and computing competency in a digital environment. I also found it useful that you highlight the stigma around ‘getting left behind’, as this can be felt by all generations and forms a further indicator that Prensky’s initial concept is reductive.

    Your first embedded video adds an original perspective on the topic. I found it very interesting to hear a literal immigrant discuss the digital immigrant metaphor and thought Sreenivisan’s summary that ‘a digital mind-set is not about where you come from, or your age, but what you can do,’ was a productive one.

    I really like that you created a personalised map of your online approach (including Blackboard and Wikipedia!) and how you confidently assess your own digital identity.

    I too want to shift my professional online approach towards the Resident end of the spectrum.

    Thanks for providing an interesting post.

    Best,

    Catherine

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Hi! I really loved you’re post on this topic. It explained in depth the differences not only between visitors and residents but also immigrants and natives which was very helpful. The definitions themselves were clearly outlined which made the concepts easier to understand. Although you definitely expanded on these points throughout. I also liked how you included the videos as they helped me understand these concepts even more. The diagram at the end was also a good way to end your post as it helped visualise what you were explaining throughout. Overall the structure of the post was easy to read and understand and so I really enjoyed reading it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Cherie! Sorry for the late reply I had no idea you has commented, I just thought everyone didn’t see my blog haha!
      Thank you for your comments and I look forward to keeping up with your blogs in the coming weeks.
      Jordan

      Like

  5. Hi Wei! Sorry for the late reply I had no idea you has commented, I just thought everyone didn’t see my blog haha!
    I agree and I think my map would have looked more professional in my blog.
    In regards to your comment, I think the study is very intriguing linking motivation to generational differences. Whilst I would agree to some extent some segments of generations are not motivated to using online tools, as I said in my post I think there is a stigma attached with ‘getting left behind’ and thus I see this as a factor as to why everyone wishes to be online.
    However, I wouldn’t agree with Prensky’s idea that its solely due to age and therfore I think there are a vast number of factors including motivation as you said that affects individuals online use.
    Thank you for your comment and I look forward to keeping up with you blog!
    Jordan

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s